11 January 2009

Is "professional organizer" a real job?

I read Apartment Therapy every day and lately, it's been more a source of daily irritation than it has daily inspiration. That website's huge and it publishes upwards of 50 posts a day and the logistics of sorting through, editing and posting 50 posts from 30 writers every day has to be a daunting one. I get it, they work hard. However, the editorial voice of that site is getting progressively whine-y and the whole staff seems to have come down with an alarming case of what Ayn Rand called "me-too-ism." There seems to be nothing these kids won't gush over. Nothing.

Well, last week, they ran a series of articles promoting someone who bills herself a "professional organizer." Apparently, this woman makes a living by going into peoples' homes and getting them organized though something called an Organization Bootcamp. I had no idea there was such a thing. And the more I thought about it, the more it bothered me.


I don't begrudge this woman a thing. She saw a niche and she's exploiting it. Good for her. However, what kind of a society has the US become that people think they need such a profession in the first place? Have people degenerated to such a state that they need to pay someone to remind them to clean up after themselves and not be pack rats? I can already hear the rationalizations. "We're too busy nowadays!" What a load of crap. 

I'll save you some trouble and you can just send me the $100 you'd pay to attend this Organization Bootcamp.

Step one: buy one of these.


Step two: use it.

If it's important, put it in this filing cabinet. If it's not important, throw it away. Ta-daaa! You're organized. Now go make your bed and do the dishes.

3 comments:

  1. I didn't bother watching the video, but there is another side to this one dear Paul. I hired an organizer last year for a series of sessions. She helped me figure out a healthy balance in decluttering my kids rooms with them. She helped me face some paperwork I was behind on, and showed me a better way to set up my file system. I've got a handful of kids at three schools and little free time--she made a huge difference. I hired her again to help me declutter further for my move, and with her help I got my kitchen at the new house unpacked and functioning again in one day. She's got great local expertise too--not just what will the local dump take, where else can you recycle, but local moving companies, finding someone to help clean my house when I injured my back. Really, some of the best service money I've ever spent. Better than talking to a therapist. Did more to make my home beautiful and liveable than the interior designer who helped me arrange the furniture so much more effectively.

    I know a lot of the organizing advice looks like common sense, but when it's you and you're panicking, someone with a clear vision of how to clear through the mess is a godsend.

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  2. Johnna,

    How many kids do you have? I'm asking because I'm about to grant you a dispensation to do anything you want to do. In my book, mothers and families are exempt from all rules that bind the childless. I have a sister with seven kids and a sister-in-law with nine if you can believe that. Watching these much-beloved women do what they do is the single most inspiring thing I can think of. I wouldn't bat an eye if my sister or my sister-in-law hired an organizer.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Well if you're lazy and would rather spend money having someone teach you to clean up after yourself, then maybe you deserve to be exploited. I can understand hiring local moving companies to help out during a move, but an organizer chick? I'm skeptical.

    ReplyDelete

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